Aims and Scope

The Open Anesthesia Journal is an open access online journal, which publishes research articles, reviews/mini-reviews, letters and guest edited single topic issues, in all areas of experimental and clinical research in anesthesia, pharmacokinetics, anesthetic mechanisms, critical care, preoperative care, clinical skills, cost issues, coexisting disease and other factors affecting treatment.


The Open Anesthesia Journal, a peer-reviewed journal, is an important and reliable source of current information on developments in the field. The emphasis is placed on publishing quality original papers rapidly, that are available to researchers worldwide.


Recent Articles

The Feasibility and Applications of Non-invasive Cardiac Monitoring in Obese Patients Undergoing Day-case Surgery: Results of a Prospective Observational Study

P. Sansone, L.G. Giaccari, U. Colella, F. Coppolino, M.C. Pace, M.B. Passavanti, V. Pota, C. Aurilio

Aims:

This prospective observational study evaluates the utility of non-invasive cardiac monitoring in obese patients in the day-surgery case, considering factors, such as Body Mass Index (BMI) and anaesthesia technique.

Background:

Obese patients are more likely to be admitted to hospital or to get hospitalized because they are more prone to concomitant diseases and obesity itself is not a contraindication to day surgery. Obese patients are a high-risk patient population that may particularly benefit from monitoring perioperative haemodynamic variations.

Methods:

In this observational study, we compared haemodynamic variations between overweight or obese and normal weight patients undergoing day-case surgery. We adopted NICOM® as a non-invasive cardiac output monitoring.

Objective:

The aim of the current study was to investigate the haemodynamic impact of BMI and anaesthesia technique during day-case surgery procedures. The other goal was to evaluate the feasibility and applications of non-invasive cardiac output monitoring among the obese population in day-surgery.

Results:

74 patients were included in the study. 34 were overweight or obese (weight 84 ± 10 kg, height 160 ± 10 cm, BMI ≈ 30 kg/m2), 40 were normal weight (weight 63 ± 15 kg, height 160 ± 10 cm, BMI ≈ 22 kg/m2). Compared to normal-weight patients, obese patients show an increase in blood pressure with a return to baseline values at the end of surgery (p < 0.05). The Cardiac Output (CO) shows a similar trend, whereas the heart rate is normal. A decrease in the Cardiac Index (CI) during the operation was noticed in both groups, the one in obese patients (p = 0.24) being greater. In the same way, the Stroke Volume Index (SVI) was lower in obese patients during surgery (p < 0.05). In spinal anaesthesia, the Total Peripheral Resistance Index (TPRI) was not statistically different between the groups of study. As for the TPRI in obese patients, we reported values similar to the ones in non-obese patients in spinal anaesthesia. In local anesthesia, TPRI was higher in obese patients than in non-obese.

Conclusion:

Cardiovascular alterations in relation to obesity include an increase in blood pressure, CO and SV. An inadequate monitoring of haemodynamic parameters is a risk factor for perioperative complications. NICOM® provides a continuous, non-invasive haemodynamic measurement.


September 22, 2020
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Editor's Choice

Effect of Adding Dexmedetomidine to Bupivacaine in Ultrasound Guided Rectus Sheath Block: A Randomized Controlled Double-blinded Study

Wafaa T Salem, Khaled A Alsamahy, Wael A Ibrahim, Abear S Alsaed, Mohamed M Salaheldin

Background:

Extended midline laparotomy incision is accompanied by intense pain postoperatively which affects patients’ physiology; therefore, good control of postoperative pain is mandatory to decrease the adverse effects on the body. Ultrasound-guided Bilateral Rectus Sheath Block (BRSB) is one of the options to achieve this goal.

Objective:

The study aimed to assess the analgesic potency of adding dexmedetomidine to bupivacaine in ultrasound-guided BRSB in cancer patients with a midline laparotomy incision.

Methods:

Sixty adult cancer patients planned for laparotomies with extended midline incision were included. Ultrasound-guided BRSB was performed immediately after the induction of anesthesia.

Patients were classified randomly into two groups; B group, where only bupivacaine was used for BRSB and BD group in whom a mixture of bupivacaine and dexmedetomidine was used.

Results:

A significant decrease in visual analogue scale scores, total morphine consumption, postoperative nausea and vomiting and postoperative cortisol levels was observed in group BD.

Conclusion:

Dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in US-guided rectus sheath block bilaterally proved to be effective for proper pain management postoperatively in cancer patients after extended midline abdominal incision.


April 30, 2019
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